Street Artist Pablo Delgado
Pablo Delgado, renowned as a key London street artist of the 21st century, has installed East Wing Biennial’s first commission for INTERACT ; a selection of ten miniature paste up scenes.
Dotted around the Courtauld Institute’s interior, you can find delightful miniature appropriations of a selection of works of art from The Courtauld Gallery, including Manet’s A Bar at Folies-Bergere and Vincent van Gogh’s Self-Portrait with a Bandaged Ear.
Delgado wanted the miniatures to be framed by their surroundings so he focused upon different textures as the basis for his works, in particular the two brick walls outside the library and in the café. The location and immediate space is crucial to the character of each piece, as they interrelate with the exhibition space. Delgado uses the bright orange to draw attention to the miniatures, despite their size, and latterly painted on the shadows spilling out into our own space making sure everyone will INTERACT with Delgado’s miniature figures, whether intentionally or subconsciously.
Delgado’s choice of images make this first commission unique to the Courtauld and the exclusivity of the East Wing Biennial project as well as proving a fun talking point for students, professors and visitors alike. Street Artist Pablo Delgado
Pablo Delgado, renowned as a key London street artist of the 21st century, has installed East Wing Biennial’s first commission for INTERACT ; a selection of ten miniature paste up scenes.
Dotted around the Courtauld Institute’s interior, you can find delightful miniature appropriations of a selection of works of art from The Courtauld Gallery, including Manet’s A Bar at Folies-Bergere and Vincent van Gogh’s Self-Portrait with a Bandaged Ear.
Delgado wanted the miniatures to be framed by their surroundings so he focused upon different textures as the basis for his works, in particular the two brick walls outside the library and in the café. The location and immediate space is crucial to the character of each piece, as they interrelate with the exhibition space. Delgado uses the bright orange to draw attention to the miniatures, despite their size, and latterly painted on the shadows spilling out into our own space making sure everyone will INTERACT with Delgado’s miniature figures, whether intentionally or subconsciously.
Delgado’s choice of images make this first commission unique to the Courtauld and the exclusivity of the East Wing Biennial project as well as proving a fun talking point for students, professors and visitors alike. Street Artist Pablo Delgado
Pablo Delgado, renowned as a key London street artist of the 21st century, has installed East Wing Biennial’s first commission for INTERACT ; a selection of ten miniature paste up scenes.
Dotted around the Courtauld Institute’s interior, you can find delightful miniature appropriations of a selection of works of art from The Courtauld Gallery, including Manet’s A Bar at Folies-Bergere and Vincent van Gogh’s Self-Portrait with a Bandaged Ear.
Delgado wanted the miniatures to be framed by their surroundings so he focused upon different textures as the basis for his works, in particular the two brick walls outside the library and in the café. The location and immediate space is crucial to the character of each piece, as they interrelate with the exhibition space. Delgado uses the bright orange to draw attention to the miniatures, despite their size, and latterly painted on the shadows spilling out into our own space making sure everyone will INTERACT with Delgado’s miniature figures, whether intentionally or subconsciously.
Delgado’s choice of images make this first commission unique to the Courtauld and the exclusivity of the East Wing Biennial project as well as proving a fun talking point for students, professors and visitors alike.

Street Artist Pablo Delgado

Pablo Delgado, renowned as a key London street artist of the 21st century, has installed East Wing Biennial’s first commission for INTERACT ; a selection of ten miniature paste up scenes.

Dotted around the Courtauld Institute’s interior, you can find delightful miniature appropriations of a selection of works of art from The Courtauld Gallery, including Manet’s A Bar at Folies-Bergere and Vincent van Gogh’s Self-Portrait with a Bandaged Ear.

Delgado wanted the miniatures to be framed by their surroundings so he focused upon different textures as the basis for his works, in particular the two brick walls outside the library and in the café. The location and immediate space is crucial to the character of each piece, as they interrelate with the exhibition space. Delgado uses the bright orange to draw attention to the miniatures, despite their size, and latterly painted on the shadows spilling out into our own space making sure everyone will INTERACT with Delgado’s miniature figures, whether intentionally or subconsciously.

Delgado’s choice of images make this first commission unique to the Courtauld and the exclusivity of the East Wing Biennial project as well as proving a fun talking point for students, professors and visitors alike.